Meaning for today.
Help for tomorrow.

Previously Dementia-Friendly Communities of Northern Colorado

No one walking the dementia journey has to walk alone.

Right now, 7 million Americans are living with dementia. The number of people living with a dementia-related diagnosis is expected to triple by 2050. Loneliness has been linked with twice the risk of developing dementia. One-third of the American workforce is serving in caregiving roles.  Those caring for someone with dementia are at increased risk for depression.  Our local care partner support group participants admit,  “We’ve felt other friends backing away ever since my spouse got the diagnosis. This social distancing isn’t new for us. That’s why you guys are so important. We don’t have to explain ourselves. Understanding is assumed.”  And that’s why we are Dementia Together.

Dementia Together (previously known as “Dementia-Friendly Communities of Northern Colorado”) is on a mission to make sure no one has to walk this journey alone.

At Dementia Together, we’re committed to cultivating joy while building stronger connections – for those living with dementia, their care partners, and the community.

Care Partner

Find life enrichment programs that you and your loved ones can attend together, or support groups to help you in every stage of the journey.

Senior Care Professionals

Become a Dementia-Friendly Leader and check out the schedule of life enrichment programs for your residents or patients.

Business & Community

Together, we can make Fort Collins and all of Northern Colorado a friendly place for our neighbors living with dementia.

Together… Online

Check the calendar for upcoming activities and programs!

“As soon as you start going to these things, you just can’t help it. You want to keep going for the support and friendships.” – Deborah Crandell

harlan-and-marlene-circle

Today is a good day. I like it here.”

Harlan: “Sometimes with my problem…this is the problem I have…what is it honey?”

Marlene tenderly responded: “You have dementia.”

Harlan:  “Yes, I have dementia.   I can’t get things out…Some days are good. Some are bad.”

Harlan looked toward his beloved wife and added: “Today is a good day.  I like it here.”

While reminiscing at Memory Café about favorite school memories, in the comfort of friends who aren’t rushing or correcting him, Harlan shared the story of when he saw his future bride for the first time.

“I saw her across the band room, she was over there, and I was over here…and I thought, “WO!”.

All the memory café friends joined him in laughter. We asked Marlene if she thought the same thing.  Her attempt at a diplomatic response brought even more laughter: “No, not really.” Despite Harlan’s aphasia, he quickly came back in jest with, “and it’s been like that for a long time!”

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